giraffe butt
giraffe butt (i.e. no interest in sticking around to hang with us as we drove into work)
The invasive prickly pear being attacked by cochineal, a scale insect that has been introduced as a biocontrol agent.
The invasive prickly pear being attacked by cochineal, a scale insect that has been introduced as a biocontrol agent.
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Zebra! These guys are plains zebra. There was a pack of the rarer, weirder-looking Grevy’s zebra standing nearby as well.
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There are TONS of butterflies out on the black cotton soils. Haven’t even come close to learning them all but they’re really diverse. Or at least it seems that way to me, as a savanna newbie.
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Exhibit B.
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Georgia and Michelle found a giraffe skull while doing field work one day, and brought it home so we could paint it. As you do.
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A view of the Centre, from right behind the dining area.
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Aforementioned dining area.
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The administrative offices.
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The view from Lookout Rock, where we went for a sundowner last week.
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An example of the fencing used to exclude large (and medium-sized, in this case) herbivores from the experimental plots.
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Being taught about savanna grasses.
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Hoping that these suckers’ll stay in the ground for a few months! Apparently elephants can be quite the curious creatures, and pull experiments up pretty frequently…got my fingers crossed that they won’t find these bags at all interesting.
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One of the KLEE plots
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Black cotton soil ecosystem
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This is actually the view out my living room window, at sunrise. Does not suck to wake up to at all.
gecko eggs, laid in the hollow left behind from a dead tree branch.
Lookout rock, part deux.
AN ELEPHANT.  YES I REACTED THIS WAY IN REAL LIFE AS WELL.
AN ELEPHANT. YES I REACTED THIS WAY IN REAL LIFE AS WELL.
And there's it's lady friend!  (...look closely.  Again, you'll have to trust me on this.)
…trust me, there’s an ostrich in there. THERE’S AN OSTRICH, OKAY?
And there’s its lady friend! (You’ll have to trust me on that as well; look in the middle for a fatter, rounder tree-like thing. It’s not a tree. It’s an ostrich.)
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